Economics Dictionary of Arguments

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Brocker I 121
Politics/Spengler: it is a matter for Spengler to grasp well-founded and experience-filled politics, and thus politics "as it really has been made in the course of history, and not how it should have been made", because the "designs of people doing good have nothing to do with historical reality" (1).
Spengler's thesis: Politics arises in the context of dynamically conceivable streams of existence and life, constant change in the districts of living human existence:
Brocker I 122
All of life is politics, in every impulsive move, right to the very core". Vitality, life energy, thus "that 'it' in us that wants to go forward and upwards at all costs, the blind, cosmic, longing urge for validity and power, that remains plant-like and racially connected to the earth, the 'home', being judged and having to work is what everywhere among higher people as political life seeks and must seek the great decisions". (2) (Spengler pro vitalism)
Brocker I 125
Five elements characterize Spengler's "philosophy of politics": 1. The emphasized importance of the great personality, the born politician with the abilities of an exceptional person, on whom all really significant developments and changes go back,
Brocker I 126
2. the consistent, historically founded anti-universalism, which does not accept the concept of "humanity" and all attempts to give meaning to it in terms of historical philosophy.
Humanity has no goal (3). 3. A strict rejection of political ideals or an orientation towards a final state. 4. The postulate of a historical determinism based on naturalism, which ties factual processes to the phases of life of advanced civilizations, 5. The consistent negation of a sense of historical (and thus also political) events.
Brocker I 127
Recently, Spengler's work has again been received by Samuel P. Huntington, among others. See Politics/Huntington.


1. Oswald Spengler, Der Untergang des Abendlandes. Umrisse einer Morphologie der Weltgeschichte, Bd. 1: Gestalt und Wirklichkeit, Wien/Leipzig 1918; umgestaltete Aufl. München 1923; Bd. 2: Welthistorische Perspektiven, München 1922. Oswald Spengler, Der Untergang des Abendlandes. Umrisse einer Morphologie der Weltgeschichte. Vollständige Ausgabe in einem Band, München 1963.S. 1108.
2.Ebenda S. 1108f.
3.Ebenda S. 28


Hans-Christof Klaus, Oswald Spengler, Der Untergang des Abendlandes (1918/1922) in: Manfred Brocker (Hg.) Geschichte des politischen Denkens. Das 20. Jahrhundert. Frankfurt/M. 2018.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.
The note [Author1]Vs[Author2] or [Author]Vs[term] is an addition from the Dictionary of Arguments. If a German edition is specified, the page numbers refer to this edition.

Spengler I
Oswald Spengler
Politische Schriften München 1932

Brocker I
Manfred Brocker
Geschichte des politischen Denkens. Das 20. Jahrhundert Frankfurt/M. 2018


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